CONTACT

FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM

So much of the art I love is a celebration of nature, and I find Sandra Allen's intricate pencil drawings of tree trunks to the be the ultimate love letter to the natural world. 
•
"Flux" | Pencil on paper | 53 x 53 inches | 2016
•
@sandraallenartist #sandraallen @winterhouseprojects #winterhouseprojects
So much of the art I love is a celebration of nature, and I find Sandra Allen's intricate pencil drawings of tree trunks to the be the ultimate love letter to the natural world. 
•
"Flux" | Pencil on paper | 53 x 53 inches | 2016
•
@sandraallenartist #sandraallen @winterhouseprojects #winterhouseprojects
Wednesday Woman: Katt Both
•
Katt Both was a German photographer, furniture designer, and architect. 
•
Born in a small town in central Germany, Both studied furniture design at the Bauhaus from 1924 to 1928 under the Hungarian painter and photographer László Moholy-Nagy. She also studied in the carpentry workshop, run by Marcel Breuer.
•
While the founding director of the Bauhaus, Walter Gropius, promised equal treatment for men and women, many of the women who enrolled in the school felt that true equality didn’t exist there. Both said about her studies at the Bauhaus, “We learned nothing, we only strengthened our character.”
•
Nevertheless, Both utilized the close network of Bauhaus avant-garde creatives to establish her career in architecture and furniture design. After finishing her studies in Dessau, she worked with the Luckhardt brothers’ architecture firm in Berlin. In March 1929, she was hired by Otto Haesler in Celle — the firm’s first woman architect. 
•
Both was also a photographer. Almost all the Bauhaus artists dabbled in photography, in addition to design and architecture. They used to medium to document, both casually and purposefully, the Bauhaus’ radical ideas and vision.
•
Both’s photography work was experimental, incorporating elements from advertising and still life. Her black and white images capture household objects and products like cigarettes and playing cards.
•
After WWII, Both moved to Kassel, where she designed and built her own house. She lived there until the end of her life in 1985.
Wednesday Woman: Carol Ross Barney
•
“Public space shouldn’t be thought of as a gift. It should be an expectation.”
•
Carol Ross Barney is an American architect born in Chicago, Illinois in 1949. She studied architecture at the University of Illinois and enlisted in the Peace Corps immediately after graduating from college. Assigned to Costa Rica, she worked with the National Park Service on projects to protect coral reefs, restore parks, and design worker housing.
•
Returning to Chicago after the Peace Corps, she joined an architecture firm and worked on the restoration of the Chicago Public Library and improvements to the Post Office.
•
Barney was a founding member of Chicago Women in Architecture in 1973 and started her own practice in 1981. Awarded a fellowship from the University of Illinois, Barney was able to study the post war planning and rebuilding of European cities from 1983-84. One of her studio’s first notable projects was the Oklahoma City Federal Building, which replaced the Murrah Federal Building after a domestic terrorist attack.
•
Barney was the recipient of the 2023 Gold Medal from the American Institute of Architects. Barney’s studio is renowned for its expertise in civic space design and dedication to creating exceptional public spaces. From community facilities to academic and research buildings, as well as innovative transit stations and urban places and spaces, Carol’s work has left a lasting impact on Chicago and beyond.
•
Barney has been teaching an advanced Design Studio at the Illinois Institute of Technology for over thirty years, continuously sharing her belief in the transformative power of the built environment on our daily lives.
As Women’s History Month comes to a close, I wanted to highlight the work of five influential, but often-overlooked, women designers and architects: Jane Drew, Lina Bo Bardi, Norma Merrick Sklarek, Eileen Gray, and Anna Castelli Ferrieri.
Wednesday Woman: Rozana Montiel
•
“We assume beauty as a basic right, understanding how to dignify spaces for everyone.”
•
Rozana Montiel is the director and founder of Rozana Montiel Estudio de Arquitectura (REA), a Mexico City-based studio focused on architectural design, artistic re-conceptualizations of space, and the public domain.
•
Montiel always had an interest in design and space. Her parents were art collectors who mostly collected paintings from Mexican artists. Her father suggested she study architecture, which she did at the Universidad Iberoamericana. She then went on to study Architectural Theory and Criticism in Barcelona at the Universitat Politécnica Catalunya. 
•
Montiel started her own practice after returning to Mexico, because she couldn’t find one that was doing more than just conventional architectonic projects. From the beginning of her career, she believed in the importance of working with other disciplines and wanted to relate architecture with art.
•
Montiel’s studio focuses on research involving living spaces, urban uses of public space, and the resignification of building materials with an emphasis on place-making, livability, and temporary uses of space. One of the studio’s notable commissions is the Void Temple, a design intervention along the Rita del Peregrino, a 73-mile pilgrimage route that consists of a white concrete wall forming a 40-meter circle amid the woods.
•
REA has designed numerous community centers and parks throughout Mexico and worked on rehabilitation of public space in housing units. The studio’s mission is to transform space into place. Montiel says, “I believe that once architecture becomes ethical, aesthetical, and practical, it can really solve concrete problems urgent in the world today.”