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Wednesday Woman: Patricia Urquiola
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“When I design a product I see it in a spontaneous interaction with space, not a conventional one. When I design an architecture, I test my products in it. If I don’t find a solution, I try to design the ideal one. For me it is an integrated process, where light, nature, sound and smell are all part of one organic entity.”
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Originally from Oviedo, Spain, Patricia Urquiola is an architect and designer based in Milan. In 2001, Urquiola and her partner Alberto Tontine founded Studio Urquiola. It operates in the fields of industrial product design, architecture, art direction, and strategy consulting.
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Urquiola is known for her furniture, objects and lighting that combine originality, comfort and respect for the environment, as well as for her work in the luxury hotel sector, such as for Il Sereno Hotel. Her studio focuses on modern style with feminine accents and unexpected elements.
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Urquiola begins a project by establishing the “fundamental element,” the basis of each project which always keeps her on track and accompanies her whole design process: thinking spaces or objects in relation to people. Something she learned from her mentor Achille Castiglioni, to uncover this element Urquiola first builds an empathic connection with the user that will eventually interact with her designs.
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Studio Urquiola is frequently asked to design not only objects and architectures, but also to think about the future of mobility, workplace, and production cycles. Creating links between craftsmanship and industrial research, heritage and innovation, Urquiola drives companies she works with to upcycle once-waste material and tries to re-image entire processes, leading them to change, evolution, and innovation.
Wednesday Woman: Tadáskía
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“For me, being trans is related to being human, and the drawing humanizes the condition of being trans. One thing becoming another thing, transformation and ambiguity.”
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Tadáskía is a multidisciplinary artist based in Brazil who uses drawing, sculpture, and mixed media to articulate themes of transformation and joy influenced by her experiences as a Black trans woman. Her work in drawing, photography, installation, and textiles mobilizes invented and mystical landscapes.
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Tadáskía’s first solo presentation in the United States opened recently at MoMA’s Projects Room, co-presented by the Studio Museum in Harlem. The installation takes over the tall walls of the gallery with immersive drawings created by the artist over a period of 2 weeks at MoMA. “I started with closed eyes and made a prayer, offering the drawings to the world,” says Tadáskía, who frequently employs an improvisational approach. Using charcoal and colored dry pastels, she weaves a free, lyrical narrative referencing Brazil’s political and spiritual life and the history of her ancestors. The installation also includes two curving sculptures in the center of the gallery and a series of works on paper titled ave preta mística mystical black bird (2022) mounted over the wall piece.
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Birds are a motif through the monumental wall drawings — inspired by the sankofa, a mythical black bird among the Akan people of Ghana. Its head turns toward the past as its feet move into the future, symbolizing the importance of knowing one’s own past. Tadáskía’s sankofa-like figures look back while fluttering forward, through rich and colorful landscapes that morph through abstract shapes.
Passive House architecture is "a quickly-growing approach to building that sharply reduces energy use by going simple: employing techniques like continuous insulation, air-tight sealing, and top quality windows; making better use of both sun and shade, and bringing in fresh air through advanced filtering."
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Thank you @sjlubell and @kaufmandavidnyc for this story in @nypost on Khalil Gibran International Academy and PS 456 in Brooklyn, designed by @architecture.research.office, which will be NYC's first Passive House school and one of the largest Passive House schools in the country when it is completed this fall.
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Link in bio to read the article 🔗
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📸 courtesy of Architecture Research Office